Monthly Archives: August 2018

About Perfumes

Where does perfume come from? Body scents have actually been around since the ancient Egyptians, but modern-day perfumes didn’t actually appear until the end of the 19th Century. Fragrances like perfume and cologne started out as mixes of oils and scents, but in modern times, they’re mostly ethyl alcohol with some essential oils added in varying degrees. Perfume has the highest concentration of essential oils – at about 30 percent of the mixture – while aftershaves and splashes have no more than three percent. Cologne falls somewhere between eight and ten percent. In general, most fragrances on the market, and since the 1960s, have been eau de parfum and eau de toilette scents, both of which respectively follow perfume in concentration.

The first scents used were oils or unguents by the ancient Egyptians, particularly myrrh and frankincense. Rose and peppermint were made into unguents by letting the leaves steep in oil. But the actual start of modern-day fragrances, referred to the “perfume era,” was the late 19th Century. Although more general knowledge of organic chemistry sparked interest in developing scents, the center of fragrance creation was Grasse in Provence, France, where the leather treating industry was trying to find scents to cover up those from tanned leather.

By the 20th Century, many of today’s notable fragrances were created, including Chanel No. 5, Shalimar by Guerlain, and Tabu by Dana between 1920 and 1940. Modern some fragrances companies, such as Coty and Yardley, were also established by this time, as well. Perfume, however, was considered a high-end product until the 1960s, and designer perfumes by Yves Saint Laurent and other designers entered the market at affordable prices for the middle class. The ’80s, on the other hand, saw a spike in fragrances by designer clothing brands, with Giorgio Beverly Hills and Obsession by Calvin Klein being some of the notable designer brand fragrances at the time.

Know About Perfume

Perfume (Latin “per fume” meaning “through smoke”) was highly favored by the Egyptians, Romans, and Arabs. In East Asia, perfumes were incense based. People used to make perfumes from spices and herbs like bergamot, myrtle, coriander, conifer resin, and almond. The use of flowers came only after Avicenna, an Iranian doctor and chemist showed the process of distillation, whereby oils could be extracted from flowers. In 1370, at the behest of Queen Elizabeth of Hungary, the world’s first modern perfume – “Hungary Water” was made by blending scented oils in alcohol solution.

The composition of a perfume is of vital significance and is handled by an expert known as a perfumer, who deals with primary scents like rose, jasmine, cola, etc; modifiers like esters; blenders like linalool and hydroxycitronellol; and fixatives like resins, wood scents, and amber bases. The resulting scent is explained in a musical metaphor of three ‘notes’, namely, top notes (consisting of fast evaporating small size molecules) like citrus and ginger scents; middle notes (consisting of slow evaporating medium size molecules) like lavender and rose scents; and base notes (consisting of slowest evaporating largest size molecules) like fixatives etc. All these notes work together like a musical chord.

Perfume oils contain volatile compounds in high concentrations and thus have to be diluted by solvents, so that injury is not caused when applied directly on skin or clothes. The common solvent is pure ethanol or ethanol mixed with water. Fractionated coconut oil or wax, neutral smelling fats such as jojoba, can also act as solvents and dilute the perfume oil. The perfume oil is further mixed with other aromatic compounds. Generally, the percentage of aromatic compounds in perfume extract is 20% to 40%; in eau de parfum is 10% to 30%; in eau de toilette is 5% to 20%; and in eau de cologne is 2% to 5%.

The oil concentration in a perfume along with other aromatic compounds, determines the intensity, longevity, and price of the perfume and thus it is a closely guarded secret of every perfumer and perfume house. By adjusting the percentage level and the notes of the perfume, variations on the same brand may be created like Chanel’s Pour Monsieur and Pour Monsieur Concentrée.

Classification of perfumes is never complete, due to its ever-evolving nature. The traditional classification comprises of categories like Single Floral, Floral Bouquet, Ambery, Woody, Leather, Chypre, and Fougère; while the modern classification comprises of Bright Floral, Green, Oceanic/Ozone, Citrus/Fruity, and Gourmand. In 1983, Michael Edwards, a perfume consultant, created a new fragrance classification “The Fragrance Wheel”, which classified and sub-grouped five standard families, namely Floral (Floral, Soft Floral, Floral Oriental), Oriental (Soft Oriental, Oriental, Woody Oriental), Woody (Wood, Mossy Woods, Dry Woods), Fougère (has fragrance elements from all the families), and Fresh (Citrus, Green, Water).

Perfumery has used a number of aromatic sources like plants, animals, and synthetic sources in the making of perfumes. Plants are used as a source of aroma compounds and essential oils. The parts of plants that are used are:

1 – Bark (cinnamon, cascarilla);

2 – Flowers (rose, jasmine, osmanthus, tuberose, mimosa, vanilla);

3 – Blossoms (citrus, ylang-ylang, clove);

4 – Fruits (apples, strawberries, cherries, litsea cubeba, juniper berry, vanilla, oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruit);

5 – Leaves and Twigs (lavender, patchouli, citrus, violets, sage, rosemary, hay, tomato);

6 – Resins (labdanum, myrrh, gum benzoin, Peru balsam, frankincense/olibanum, pine, fir, amber, copal);

7 – Roots, Bulbs, and Rhizomes (vetiver roots, ginger and iris rhizomes);

8 – Seeds (coriander, cocoa, mace, cardamom, anise, nutmeg, caraway, tonka bean);

9 – Woods (agarwood, birch, rosewood, sandalwood, pine, birch, juniper, cedar).

Animal sources include Ambergris, Castoreum, Musk, Rom terpenes, Honeycomb, and Civet. Other natural sources include Lichens and Protists. Synthetic sources include synthetic odorants synthesized from petroleum distillates, pine resins, etc. Modern perfumes are mostly made from synthetic sources as they allow fragrances not found in nature, like Calone is a synthetic compound that imparts a marine metallic ozonous fragrance. Synthetic aromatics are more consistent than natural aromatics, and are hence, widely used nowadays in modern available perfumes.

All About Versace Women Perfume

The Versace Women Perfume is a remarkable women’s perfume created by Gianni Versace in the tear of 2001. This is the combination fragrances of Frangipani blossoms and leaves with eglantine, jasmine as well as bergamot. There are also other scents of the fruity tones of raspberry and plum available.

How to Get It

If you’re interested in finding the perfume lines, there are actually some discount online stores that you may want to check out. Nevertheless, it is valuable for you to be very careful to prevent buying unoriginal product any time you want to order the perfume from the online stores. Ensure that you check the reliability of online stores and declare that they assure genuine products and do not sell imitations or knockoffs.

Fragrances

There are actually several fragrances that are part of the perfume line. They are Time to Relax, Baby Rose Jeans, Time for Energy, Crystal Noir, and Versace Signature.

Features

Versace Women perfume can be worn in each and every day, on the evening outings as well as special occasions.

Versace Signature and Crystal Noir

The Versace Signature perfume by Versace for Women is an Eau de Parfum. The wonderful blend of azalea and jasmine gives this perfume a floral and vibrant scent. Moreover, it has the silky softness of a veil of musk mixed with the fragrance of Moroccan cedar wood and Kashmir wood.